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Featured Poem: Ode To Autumn

Written by Chris Routledge, 1st October 2007

Thursday October 4 is National Poetry Day here in the UK and to mark the occasion we are going to be posting some of our favourite poems each day in the coming week.

At the Sefton Festival of Literature last week Andrew Motion was asked by a member of the audience which poet, living or dead, he would most like to meet. He named, among others, John Keats and in conversation afterwards agreed that 'Ode to Autumn' would be his choice. This poem is one of those works of art without which it is inconceivable to be alive. Motion asked us to consider that in the morning of September 19, 1819, this poem did not exist. By the evening it did:

Ode To Autumn

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run;
To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease;
For Summer has o'erbrimm'd their clammy cells.

Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reap'd furrow sound asleep,
Drowsed with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twinèd flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings, hours by hours.

Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,—
While barrèd clouds bloom the soft-dying day
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river-sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The redbreast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.

[1819]

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1 thought on “Featured Poem: Ode To Autumn

[…] the poetic picture of autumn is not one of outright doom and gloom; arguably the most famous Ode to Autumn, the poem with the very same title by John Keats bursts forth with a fruitful feast, marvelling in […]

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